01 Mar

Three Ways to Be Indispensable

In down turning times it is easy to get caught up in the
entire negative media and get lazy about our work.  I know many of you have asked “why should I care about a
positive mindset, going the extra mile or looking my best at work when business
is slow?”  That is exactly when you
need to be different and stand out from your peers and competition. It tells
your organization a lot about your values, goals and confidence level during
difficult times. Here are my three practices for all business professionals to
keep you in the forefront of everyone’s minds until the tide turns:

1). Have a Positive
Attitude

Many businesses have begun cutbacks on staff, expense
reimbursements, raises and bonuses. You must remain positive and be
appreciative for having a job today. Although you may be earning less, you are
still of value to your company and must have a positive mindset and be
appreciative for all that you do have today. Offer positive solutions to
cost-cutting measures to help your company see ways to save, which sometimes
they are unable to see objectively to help organizations retain employees. 

2). Go the Extra Mile

As we are all doing more with less, it’s important to take
on more responsibility, which is becoming a necessity in today’s world. This
conveys to your employer that you are responsible, efficient and you are a team
player.  If your organization is
going through a merger, buy out or transition, step up and volunteer to be on
the merger/transition team. This not only allows you to stay on the cutting edge
of decisions being made and helping others transition from outside your
organization to understanding the company culture but you will hear and see
what decisions are happening so you find out the facts first. Your voluntary
spirit will be perceived as being positive and taking a stand to help your
organization increase their market positioning.

3). Create a Polished
Image

Although business may be tougher to get today than it was a
year ago, remember you represent your corporate brand. You are the identity and
representative of the firm to your customer. Does your image visually, verbally
and non-verbally represent your firm’s values and corporate brand? I work in
companies everyday and I can tell you many employees don’t positively represent
their firm’s corporate brand image. You may need to spiff up your image now
more than ever. When organizations are downsizing, oftentimes one’s image may
be a determining factor in your being let go. Many times employers won’t tell
you the truth but the fact is that talent and performance isn’t enough
today.  Looking great today will
allow you to reap many benefits in the future because you stand on your
personal reputation of your personal and corporate brand.

Companies do remember in hard times who helped to shift a
negative work environment to a more positive one, which employees were
courageous and stepped up to take on more responsibility and continued to
positively influence their corporate brand through their appearance and
professional grace. When all these tumultuous times are over and the economy is
back in full swing, you will be the one who stood out from the crowd and be
recognized by attaining great career positioning than your negative peers.    

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Sarah Hathorn
Sarah Hathorn, CEO of Hathorn Consulting Group, is the go-to-expert in working with leaders and companies to create successful corporate DNA. As an executive coach, consultant and speaker she collaborates globally with clients and brands such as Kimberly-Clark, Sherwin-Williams, Home Depot and other leading organizations.
Sign up today to get my newsletter, Corporate DNA for leadership articles on how to maximize your talent pipeline, develop & enhance leadership capabilities, inspire and influence to communicate top results and much more, visit www.hathornconsultlinggroup.com

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